A Vet Tech by Any Other Name Is…

There exist throughout the world many careers that people have very little knowledge about that, when discussed, typically elicit reactions like, “I really didn’t know about this.” This may be quite true for people who are looking to pursue a career in veterinary medicine but aren’t quite sure what career types are available other than becoming a full-fledged DVM. Knowing about a career such as a veterinary technician may help many individuals decide that this is a good choice. The first thing that you need to understand is that this particular career goes by quite a few names throughout the world including veterinary technologist, animal nurse, animal health technician or technologist and probably a few more not touched upon here. What it is not is veterinary assistant. This is a completely separate career choice, although it possesses many similarities included in a job description for veterinary technician.

What are Some of the Differences?

The differences between an veterinarian assistant and a technician include many educational requirements as well as job responsibilities. The education and job responsibilities will dictate which areas of veterinary medicine in which a technician or assistant will be authorized to work. There are also great differences in salaries as well as function demands. Technicians are degreed professionals that will make more money than assistants who are usually trained through a short certificate-granting course and possibly on-the-job training.

Take the Oath
Did you know that all educated and qualified veterinary technicians sometimes confirm that they will abide by be acceptable standards and practices by declaring the veterinary technician oath? Although it is not required by many commercially established animal medical practices and facilities, it does exist:

“I solemnly dedicate myself to aiding animals and society by providing excellent care and services for animals, by alleviating animal suffering, and promoting public health. I accept my obligations to practice my profession conscientiously and with sensitivity, adhering to the professions Code of Ethics, and furthering my knowledge and competence through a commitment to lifelong learning.”

Technician Work Opportunities Abound
Many people do not realize that there is a vast variety of job functions open to qualified veterinary technicians other than just working behind closed doors in an animal clinic or hospital. Opportunities do exist for qualified veterinary technicians to work in places that people don’t normally think about them employed at including animal shelters, pet stores, farms, aquariums and zoos. Additionally, there are opportunities for veterinary technician employment at many animal theme parks or wildlife preserves throughout the world where the professional’s skill and knowledge are put to the test through daily work activity.

Education Also Varies
Another piece of information about becoming a veterinary technician that many people may not realize is that you are not limited to attending a traditional brick-and-mortar institution to gain your education. There are many qualifying accredited veterinary technician learning programs online that will lead you in the proper direction toward a rewarding and fulfilling career. This particular feature might prove quite valuable to many people who need to continue working while learning another trade that will help enhance their lifestyle as well as benefit themselves and family.

More than Medical
Another interesting fact about job opportunities for educated and qualified veterinary technicians is that they are not just limited to the medical field. Many qualified veterinary technicians are licensed animal trainers employed to help mold and direct behavior and possibly involved in teaching animals to do tricks. Many licensed veterinary technicians are employed teaching and training guard dogs, police dogs and seeing-eye dogs.

All it takes to become a qualified veterinary technician is a great love for animals and selecting the correct education program that will prepare you for this exciting career.

Penn Foster College
A.A.S. in Veterinary Technology
Penn Foster College - Distance Learning Program
Become a vet tech in as little as 1 year. The Penn Foster Veterinary Technician associate degree program is fully accredited by the AVMA.
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